Physical And Emotional Changes During The Third Trimester of Pregnancy

Physical And Emotional Changes During The Third Trimester Of Pregnancy

Posted on 27. Jan, 2012 by in Conceiving, Doctor's Visits, Pregnancy Education

You’ve made it to the final trimester of pregnancy and very soon you’ll be holding your newborn baby.

Wondering what to expect in terms of physical and emotional changes? Then read on, we’ve got your covered.

Physical Changes During The Final Trimester

Expanding Belly: Your baby is putting on some weight during these last months and that means your uterus must continue to expand to compensate for your baby’s growing.

Stretch marks may be a result of this increasing bump, therefore, applying moisturizing lotion daily will help your skin be more flexible in its stretching abilities.

Lower Back and Leg Pain: Because your baby may be relaxing more towards your spine, you may experience some lower back pain and corresponding leg pain or even sciatica.

Also, the pregnancy hormones that your body has been making from day one of your pregnancy tend to relax the joints between your bones to allow for your body to become more accepting of it’s growth and weight during your pregnancy.

Wearing shoes with good support and applying a heating pad to the achy areas can help you with any discomfort.

Increased Breast Size: Your body is getting ready to welcome your baby by producing milk. This can (and normally does) lead to an increase in size of your breasts.

You may also experience some leaking of colostrum as your due date nears.

Braxton Hicks Contractions: These types of contractions are primers for your real ones once labor begins.

They are usually mild and erratic and aren’t had by all women. Personally, I never experienced them with my pregnancy.

Swelling: Your expanding uterus tends to apply pressure to the veins that return blood to your hands, feet, and legs thus causing those parts to have the ability to swell slightly or obnoxiously.

This swelling can also put pressure on your nerves that can result in numbness or tingling of certain areas.

Swelling is a common feature during the last few months of pregnancy and elevating your legs while laying down can help.

Frequent Urination: Again, blame your expanding uterus for this one as well.

It’s putting pressure on your bladder and can leave you having to urinate much more frequently than before.

Spider Veins – Varicose Veins: Spider or varicose veins can appear in some women during their final months of pregnancy thanks in part to their increased blood flow.

Sometimes these swollen veins can be somewhat painful and appear in sensitive areas – like your rectum (known as hemorrhoids).

Emotional Changes During The Final Trimester

Fear: This emotion may set in due to the unknown. Your labor, the health of your baby, your own health, and your changing family structure all have the ability to be cause for alarm.

Anxious – Nervous: Again, the unknown is the culprit here. Will your baby be breeched, will you need a C-section, and will your baby make their debut on their projected due date are all very real concerns among pregnant women and can make even the best of us anxious and nervous.

➜ Try keeping a journal to record your emotional state and stages towards the end of your pregnancy. Enlist the help of your close friends and family to listen to your fears and have them share their birth stories with you to help put things into prospective.

➜ Always be in touch with your doctor or midwife and discuss any concerns you may have about your pregnancy and your baby.

➜ Be in constant research mode throughout your entire pregnancy. Read stories, blogs, websites, and books about how your baby is developing and how you are changing as a mother and a person as well.

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About the author: Danielle is a freelance blogger and website content manager specializing in parenting, family, pregnancy, social media, and entrepreneurial topics. To learn more about Danielle, please visit her website at www.PenPointEditorial.com.

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