4 Tips for Dealing with Cradle Cap

4 Tips for Dealing with Cradle Cap

Posted on 26. Mar, 2012 by in Birth, Doctor's Visits, newborn

Cradle cap is when your newborn has dry, flaky skin in patches on their scalp. Some cases can be worse than others, but it rarely ever gets to the point where it becomes a problem.

Luckily, cradle cap is easily treatable and goes away fairly quickly. It isn’t bothersome to your baby either, so it’s not something that you need to fret over.

Cradle cap is also extremely common, in fact, it’s something that most all infants deal with at some point and can happen at any time throughout your baby’s first year.

Here are four tips for dealing with cradle cap.


Don’t Pick At It

This is hard, since it’s an urge you mamas will have to fight. My son had mild cradle cap and I always had to temper myself to not continuously pick at it.

The dry flaky skin will fall off on its own when it’s good and ready. By gently brushing your baby’s hair after bath time, you’ll naturally loosen the scales of the cradle cap and they will exit on their own.


Try A Shampoo Specifically Designed For Cradle Cap

This isn’t a requirement, but they’re out there, and you’ll have plenty of choices.

These specific shampoos are tailored to be super gentle on your infant’s scalp and are specially formulated to help dry up and loosen the flakes and scales of cradle cap.


Try A Small Amount Of Hydrocortisone Cream

Hydrocortisone cream works wonders for many ailments, including eczema. Once our pediatrician turned us onto it, we’ve seen it work for lots of skin problems in my son.

You don’t need a lot – a pea-sized amount will do wonders for cradle cap. Apply it once in the morning and watch how it affects your baby’s cradle cap. If you feel you need more, then apply a very small amount again before bedtime.

Don’t overuse hydrocortisone cream on infants or toddlers as it contains steroids. Use the smallest amount possible to cure the problem.


Talk To Your Pediatrician

If you feel that the cradle cap isn’t getting any better, then it’s best to let your child’s pediatrician take a look at it.

They can give you further tips and tricks to help you get rid of the cradle cap.

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About the author: Danielle is a freelance blogger and website content manager specializing in parenting, family, pregnancy, social media, and entrepreneurial topics. To learn more about Danielle, please visit her website at www.PenPointEditorial.com.

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